UPDATED: Prince William adds 173 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths – Prince William Times

The Prince William Health District added fewer new COVID-19 cases on Sunday and no new deaths in the past 24 hours, leaving the county’s death toll stable at 120.

The Prince William Health District added 173 new COVID-19 cases, including 121 in the county, 46 in Manassas and six in Manassas Park. There were also four new hospitalizations, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The additions bring the local COVID-19 totals to 6,930 cases, 556 hospitalizations and 120 deaths.

Meanwhile, another 996 new COVID-19 cases were reported across the state as well as five new deaths, the lowest number since May 18. 

Last Thursday, May 28, marked the highest number of deaths — 57 — reported in a 24-hour period since the pandemic began.

The additions bring Virginia’s COVID-19 totals to 44,607 cases, 4,643 hospitalizations and 1,375 deaths, according to the latest VDH report. 

Percent-positivity rate: Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests fell from 19.4% to 18.6% on Sunday. The local rate remains the highest in the state for the second day in a row. 

Lord Fairfax Health District, which has had the highest percent-positivity rate in Virginia over the past week, reported a rate of 15.1% on Sunday, down from 15.9% on Saturday. Meanwhile,  Fairfax County’s rate fell from 18.5% to 17.7% in the past 24 hours, while Richmond’s fell from 15.3% to 14.1% according to the latest VDH data.

Statewide, the percent-positivity rate fell from 13% on Saturday to 12.4% on Sunday.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered in each jurisdiction and the positive test results. The VDH reported Saturday that several test results that were initially lacking location information were added to the localities’ totals in recent days, which led most to show lower percent-positivity rates. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures the Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s three reopening phases. 

Local deaths: The Prince William Health District’s 120 COVID-19 fatalities so far include 104 in the county, 10 in the City of Manassas and six in Manassas Park.

The local health district has so far lost of 62 men and 58 women to COVID-19. They include two residents in their 30s; four in their 40s; seven in their 50s; 24 in their 60s; 31 in their 70s; and 52 age 80 and older. 

Hospitalizations: Also on Sunday, hospitalizations dipped again across the state after rising for most of the past week, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association. There were 1,458 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across Virginia, down 13 from Saturday, with 371 in intensive care units, down one, and 196 on ventilators, up two.

Also, 5,868 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Thursday, up 123 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 26,573 cases of COVID-19. 

They include 1,974 in Alexandria, up 14; 2,116 in Arlington, up nine; 1,092 in the City of Manassas, up 46; 305 in Manassas Park, up six; and 11,110 in Fairfax County, up 204.

Meanwhile, there are now 315 cases in Fauquier County, up three; 2,575 in Loudoun County, up 46; 5,533 in Prince William County, up 121; 556 in Spotsylvania County, up 32; and 713 in Stafford County, up 11.

Prince William cases, hospitalizations, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Sunday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19 cases, with 1,510, up 39 from Saturday. The age group makes up 22.1%, of the county’s total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 106 have been hospitalized and four have died, unchanged in the last 24 hours.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,285, up 27 from Saturday. The age group makes up 18.8% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 66 have been hospitalized, up two, and two have died, which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the third-highest number of cases with 1,232, up 33 from Saturday. Residents in their 20s make up 18.1% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 32 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 1,113, up 23 from Saturday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.3% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 130 have been hospitalized and seven have died, both of which are unchanged.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 463, up 22 from Saturday. The group makes up 6.8% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, four have been hospitalized and none have died, unchanged in the past 24 hours.

The county’s children — those ages 9 and younger  accounted for 230 cases, up five from Saturday. Children under 9 comprise 3.4% of the county’s total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 230 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, five have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 607, up 12 from Saturday. The age group makes up 8.4%, of the county’s total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 103 have been hospitalized, up one, and 24 have died, unchanged from Saturday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 215 cases, up four since Saturday. They comprise 3.2% of the county’s total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 215 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 58 have been hospitalized, up one, and 31 have died, unchanged in the last 24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Sunday, 166 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up five in the last 24 hours. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.4% of the county’s cases.

Of the 166 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 52 have been hospitalized, up one, and 52 have died, both of which are unchanged from Saturday.

Virginia COVID-19 Dashboard

Saturday, May 30: Prince William adds 196 new COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

The Prince William Health District lost three more residents to COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, bringing the county’s death toll to 120. Meanwhile the county, Manassas and Manassas Park reported 196 new cases on May 30 — up 44 from the 152 reported on Friday.

New COVID-19 fatalities in the Prince William Health District include three residents of Prince William County. Two were women and one was a man; one was in their 70s, while two were age 80 or older, according to the data released by the Virginia Department of Health.

The VDH releases only limited information about VDH fatalities, including age (within 10 years), gender and place of residence.

Northern Virginia joined the rest of Virginia in entering phase 1 of the state’s reopening phases on Friday. New cases reported locally and across the state remained relatively stable, but new deaths reported in Virginia dipped to 12, the lowest number since Sunday, May 24.

Last Thursday, May 28, marked the highest number of deaths — 57 — reported in a 24-hour period since the pandemic began.

Virginia added 1,078 new COVID-19 cases, 72 new hospitalizations and 12 new deaths on Saturday. The additions bring Virginia’s COVID-19 totals to 43,611 cases, 4,601 hospitalizations and 1,370 deaths. 

The Prince William Health District reported 196 new cases, 14 new hospitalizations and three new deaths, bringing the local tally to 6,757 cases, 553 hospitalizations and 120 deaths. 

Percent-positivity rate: Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests fell from 20.4% to 19.4% on Saturday. At the same time, the local rate rose to the highest in the state as other jurisdictions’ rates fell at a faster pace in the past 24 hours.

Lord Fairfax Health District, which has had the highest percent-positivity rate in Virginia over the past few days, reported a rate of 15.9% on Saturday, down from 26.9% on Friday. Meanwhile,  Fairfax County’s rate fell from 19.6% to 18.5% in the past 24 hours, while Richmond’s fell from 25.2% to 15.3%, according to the latest VDH data.

Statewide, the percent-positivity rate fell from 13.4% on Friday to 13% on Saturday.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered in each jurisdiction and the positive test results.

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures the Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s three reopening phases. 

Local deaths: The Prince William Health District’s 120 COVID-19 fatalities so far include 104 in the county, 10 in the City of Manassas and six in Manassas Park.

The local health district has so far lost of 62 men and 58 women to COVID-19. They include two residents in their 30s; four in their 40s; seven in their 50s; 24 in their 60s; 31 in their 70s; and 52 age 80 and older. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 753 deaths in Northern Virginia, up 10 from Friday. They include 44 in Alexandria, unchanged; 113 in Arlington, up two; 383 in Fairfax County, up five; six in Fairfax City, unchanged; eight in Falls Church, unchanged; six in Fauquier County, unchanged; 62 in Loudoun County, unchanged; 10 in the City of Manassas, unchanged; six in Manassas Park, unchanged; 104 in Prince William County, up three; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and seven in Spotsylvania County, unchanged.

Hospitalizations: Also, on Friday, hospitalizations dipped across the state after rising for most of the past week, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association. There were 1,471 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across Virginia, down 53 from Friday, with 372 in intensive care units, down one, and 194 on ventilators, up one.

Also, 5,745 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Thursday, up 97 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 26,075 cases of COVID-19. 

They include 1,960 in Alexandria, up 19; 2,107 in Arlington, up 18; 1,046 in the City of Manassas, up 42; 299 in Manassas Park, up 12; and 10,906 in Fairfax County, up 168.

Meanwhile, there are now 312 cases in Fauquier County, up four; 2,529 in Loudoun County, up 100; 5,412 in Prince William County, up 142; 524 in Spotsylvania County, up 24; and 702 in Stafford County, up 21.

Prince William cases, hospitalizations, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Saturday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19 cases, with 1,471, up 32 from Friday. The age group makes up 22.1%, of the county’s total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 106 have been hospitalized, up two, and four have died, unchanged in the last 24 hours.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,258, up 31 from Friday. The age group makes up 18.9% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the third-highest number of cases with 1,199, up 44 from Friday. Residents in their 20s make up 18% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 32 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 1,090, up 24 from Friday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.4% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 130 have been hospitalized, up six, and seven have died, the latter of which is unchanged from Friday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 441, up 17 from Friday. The group makes up 6.6% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, four have been hospitalized and none have died, unchanged in the past 24 hours.

The county’s children — those ages 9 and younger  accounted for 225 cases, up seven from Friday. Children under 9 comprise 3.4% of the county’s total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 225 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, five have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 595, up 12 from Friday. The age group makes up 8.9%, of the county’s total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 102 have been hospitalized, up two, and 24 have died, unchanged from Friday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 211 cases, up eight since Friday. They comprise 3.2% of the county’s total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 211 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 57 have been hospitalized, up two, and 31 have died, up one in the last 24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 161 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up nine in the last 24 hours. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.4% of the county’s cases.

Of the 161 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 52 have been hospitalized, up one, and 52 have died, up two since Friday.

Friday, May 29: Prince William adds 152 new COVID-19 cases, but no new deaths, as region enters phase 1

As Northern Virginia entered phase 1 of the state’s reopening status, the state reported fewer new COVID-19 cases and deaths Friday, while the Prince William Health District reported 152 new cases, but no new deaths.

Virginia reported 20 additional COVID-19 deaths statewide, less than half the 57 reported on Thursday, which marked a new record for deaths reported in one 24-hour period.

The Prince William Health District, meanwhile, reported 152 new cases — up 63 from the 89 new cases reported Thursday, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Both the state’s and Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests continued to drift downward, however. The state wide rate fell from 13.8% on Thursday to 13.4% on Friday, while the local rate fell from 21.2% on Thursday to 20% on Friday.

Statewide, Virginia added 1,132 new COVID-19 cases, 87 hospitalizations and 20 deaths, bringing the state’s COVID-19 tallies to 42,533 cases, 4,529 hospitalizations and 1,358 deaths.

Locally, the Prince William Health District, which includes the county, Manassas and Manassas Park, added 152 new COVID-19 cases, nine hospitalizations and no new deaths. 

The additions bring the local COVID-19 tallies to 6,561 cases, 539 hospitalizations and 117 deaths.

The Prince William Health District’s 117 COVID-19 fatalities so far include 101 in the county, 10 in the City of Manassas and six in Manassas Park.

The local health district has so far lost of 61 men and 56 women to COVID-19. They include: two residents in their 30s; four in their 40s; seven in their 50s; 24 in their 60s; 30 in their 70s; and 50 age 80 and older. 

Percent-positivity rate: Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ranked third in the state on Friday, behind Lord Fairfax, which posted a rate of 26.9%, down from 29.2% on Thursday, and the City of Richmond, which posted a rate of 25.2%, according to VDH data.

The Lord Fairfax Health District includes Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren counties as well as the City of Winchester — all of which entered phase 1 of Virginia’s reopening phases on Friday, May 15.

Fairfax County was in fourth place on Friday with 19.6%, down from 20.6% on Thursday.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures the Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s three reopening phases. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 743 deaths in Northern Virginia. They include 44 in Alexandria, unchanged; 111 in Arlington, up two; 378 in Fairfax County, up seven; six in Fairfax City, unchanged; eight in Falls Church, unchanged; six in Fauquier County, unchanged; 62 in Loudoun County, adjusted down one; 10 in the City of Manassas, unchanged; six in Manassas Park, unchanged; 101 in Prince William County, unchanged; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and seven in Spotsylvania County, up one.

Hospitalizations: Also, on Friday, hospitalizations were up again across the state, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association. There were 1,524 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across Virginia, up 22 from Thursday, with 373 in intensive care units, down 43, and 193 on ventilators, down two.

Also, 5,648 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Thursday, up 176 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 25,512 cases of COVID-19. 

They include 1,941 in Alexandria, up 54; 2,089 in Arlington, up 50; 1,004 in the City of Manassas, up 33; 287 in Manassas Park, up six; and 10,738 in Fairfax County, up 235.

Meanwhile, there are now 308 cases in Fauquier County, up five; 2,429 in Loudoun County, up 111; 5,270 in Prince William County, up 113; 500 in Spotsylvania County, up 13; and 681 in Stafford County, up nine.

Prince William cases, hospitalizations, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Friday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19 cases, with 1,439, up 31 from Thursday. The age group makes up 22.3%, of the county’s total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 104 have been hospitalized and four have died, both of which are unchanged in the last 24 hours.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,227, up 22 from Thursday. The age group makes up 19% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the third-highest number of cases with 1,155, up 24 from Thursday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.9% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 32 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 1,066, up 21 from Thursday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.5% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 124 have been hospitalized, up one, and seven have died, unchanged from Thursday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 424, up 16 from Thursday. The group makes up 6.6% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, four have been hospitalized, up one in 24 hours, and none have died.

The county’s children — those ages 9 and younger  accounted for 218 cases, up eight from Thursday. Children under 9 comprise 3.4% of the county’s total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 218 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, five have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 583, up 15 from Thursday. The age group makes up 9%, of the county’s total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 100 have been hospitalized, up two, and 24 have died, unchanged from Thursday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 203 cases, up eight since Thursday. They comprise 3.1% of the county’s total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 203 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 55 have been hospitalized, up two, and 30 have died, which is unchanged in the last 24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 152 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up three in the last 24 hours. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.4% of the county’s cases.

Of the 152 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 50 have been hospitalized, up one, and 50 have died, which is unchanged since Thursday.

Thursday, May 28: Va. adds 57 new COVID-19 deaths, including 2 in PWC

Just one day before the entire state is scheduled to enter phase 1 of Virginia’s reopening phases, the commonwealth on Thursday reported the highest one-day COVID-19 death toll since the pandemic began with 57 new fatalities.

Two of those additional deaths occurred in Prince William County. They were among the 23 new fatalities reported in Northern Virginia.

In the Prince William Health District, the deaths involved one man and one woman, both age 80 or older. The additions bring the local death toll to 117, including 101 in the county, 10 in the City of Manassas and six in Manassas Park.

Local fatalities include those of 61 men and 56 women. They include: two residents in their 30s; four in their 40s; seven in their 50s; 24 in their 60s; 30 in their 70s; and 50 age 80 and older.

Meanwhile, Virginia again reported more than 1,000 new COVID-19 cases across the state. On Thursday, the state added 1,152 new COVID-19 cases, 57 hospitalizations and 57 deaths.

The additions bring the state’s COVID-19 tallies to 41,401 cases, 4,442 hospitalizations and 1,338 deaths.

The Prince William Health District, meanwhile, added 89 cases, six hospitalizations and two deaths. The additions bring the local COVID-19 tallies to 6,409 cases, 532 hospitalizations and 117 deaths. 

Percent-positivity rate: One bit of good news in Thursday’s report was that both the state and local percent-positivity rates on COVID-19 tests continues to drift downward,

The state’s percent-positivity rate is now 13.8%, down from 13.9% on Wednesday. Locally, the Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate fell to 21.2%, down from 21.5% on Wednesday. 

Prince William, however, continues to have the second-highest percent-positivity rate in the state, behind only the Lord Fairfax Health District. Lord Fairfax posted a percent-positivity rate of 29.2% on Thursday, up from 26.3% on Wednesday. The health district includes Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren counties as well as the City of Winchester — all of which entered phase one of Virginia’s reopening phases on Friday, May 15.

Fairfax County remains in third place with a percent-positivity rate of 20.6%.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures the Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s three reopening phases. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 734 deaths in Northern Virginia. They include 44 in Alexandria, up two; 109 in Arlington, unchanged; 371 in Fairfax County, up seven; six in Fairfax City, up two; eight in Falls Church, unchanged; six in Fauquier County, up one; 63 in Loudoun County, up 10; 10 in the City of Manassas, unchanged; six in Manassas Park, unchanged; 101 in Prince William County, up two; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and six in Spotsylvania County, also unchanged.

Hospitalizations: Also, on Thursday, hospitalizations were up again across the state, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association. There were 1,502 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across Virginia, up 43 from Wednesday, with 416 in intensive care units, up 26, and 195 on ventilators, down eight.

Also, 5,472 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Thursday, up 105 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 24,876 cases of COVID-19. 

They include 1,887 in Alexandria, up 63; 2,039 in Arlington, up 51; 971 in the City of Manassas, up five; 281 in Manassas Park, up one; and 10,503 in Fairfax County, up 434.

Meanwhile, there are now 303 cases in Fauquier County, up one; 2,318 in Loudoun County, up 44; 5,157 in Prince William County, up 83; 487 in Spotsylvania County, up 13; and 672 in Stafford County, up 15.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Thursday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19 cases, with 1,408, up 12 from Wednesday. The age group makes up 22.3%, of the county’s total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 104 have been hospitalized, up two, and four have died, which is unchanged in the last 24 hours.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,205, up 15 from Wednesday. The age group makes up 19.1% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the third-highest number of cases with 1,131, up 20 from Wednesday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.9% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 32 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged from Wednesday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 1,045, up 16 from Wednesday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.5% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 123 have been hospitalized, up one, and seven have died, unchanged from Wednesday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 408, up 11 from Wednesday. The group makes up 6.5% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county’s children — those ages 9 and younger  accounted for 210 cases, up five from Wednesday. Children under 9 comprise 3.3% of the county’s total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 210 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, five have been hospitalized, up two from Wednesday, and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 568, up seven from Wednesday. The age group makes up 9%, of the county’s total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 98 have been hospitalized, up one, and 24 have died, unchanged from Wednesday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 195 cases, up three since Wednesday. They comprise 3.1% of the county’s total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 195 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 53 have been hospitalized and 30 have died, unchanged in the last 24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Thursday, 149 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, unchanged in the last 24 hours. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.4% of the county’s cases.

Of the 149 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 49 have been hospitalized, up one, and 50 have died, up two from Wednesday.

Wednesday, May 27: Prince William loses 4 more residents to COVID-19, new cases drop to 95

The latest COVID-19 report is a mix of good news and bad: Fewer new COVID-19 cases were reported both locally and across the state on Wednesday, but Prince William County lost another four residents to the disease, including one person in their 40s, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The latest local COVID-19 fatalities include three residents from Prince William County and one from the City of Manassas. They include one woman and three men. One was in their 40s, one was in their 60s, one was in their 70s and one was 80 or older.

The additions bring Prince William Health District’s death toll from COVID-19 to 115. Fatalities include 55 women and 60 men; 99 were residents of the county, 10 of the City of Manassas and six of Manassas Park.

Meanwhile, COVID-19 cases reported across the state topped 40,000 on Wednesday to reach 40,249. That includes 907 new cases, down sharply from more than 1,600 reported on Tuesday. Virginia also reported 60 additional hospitalizations and 45 additional deaths.

The new numbers bring the state’s COVID-19 totals to 40,249 cases, 4,385 hospitalizations and 1,281 deaths.

The Prince William Health District added 95 new cases, five new hospitalizations and four additional deaths, bringing the local COVID-19 tallies to 6,320 cases, 526 hospitalizations and 115 deaths. 

Percent-positivity rate: Another bit of good news in Wednesday’s report was the local percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests, which dipped again on Wednesday and now stands at 21.5%, down from 22.3% on Tuesday.

Prince William’s percent-positivity, however, rose from third to second in the state, behind only Lord Fairfax, which has a rate of 26.3%. Fairfax County, which had been in second place, dropped below Prince William with 21.4% on Wednesday. The Lord Fairfax Health District includes Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren counties as well as the City of Winchester — all of which entered phase one of Virginia’s reopening phases on Friday, May 15.

Virginia’s statewide percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests also dipped again from 14.1% on Tuesday to 13.9% on Wednesday, the VDH data says.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures the Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s three reopening phases. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 710 deaths in Northern Virginia. They include 42 in Alexandria, up one; 109 in Arlington, up five; 364 in Fairfax County, up 24; four in Fairfax City, unchanged; eight in Falls Church, up two; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; 53 in Loudoun County, up one; 10 in the City of Manassas, up one; six in Manassas Park, unchanged; 99 in Prince William County, up three; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and six in Spotsylvania County, unchanged.

Hospitalizations: Hospitalizations were up across the state on Wednesday, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association. There were 1,459 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across Virginia, up 56 from Tuesday, with 390 in intensive care units, up 24, and 203 on ventilators, up 13.

Also, 5,367 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Wednesday, May 27, up 153 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 24,155 cases of COVID-19. 

They include 1,824 in Alexandria, up 39; 1,988 in Arlington, up 53; 966 in the City of Manassas, up 10; 280 in Manassas Park, up three; and 10,069 in Fairfax County, up 230.

Meanwhile, there are now 302 cases in Fauquier County, up two; 2,274 in Loudoun County, up 88; 5,074 in Prince William County, up 82; 474 in Spotsylvania County, up 11; and 657 in Stafford County, up 15.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Monday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,396, up 27 from Tuesday. The age group makes up 22.4%, of the county’s total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 102 have been hospitalized, up three, and four have died, up one from Tuesday.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,190, up nine from Tuesday. The age group makes up 19.1% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the third-highest number of cases with 1,111, up 18 from Tuesday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.8% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 32 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged from Tuesday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 1,029, up 15 from Tuesday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.5% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 122 have been hospitalized, up two, and seven have died, unchanged from Tuesday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 397, up nine from Tuesday. The group makes up 6.4% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county’s children — those ages 9 and younger  accounted for 205 cases, up five from Tuesday. Children under 9 comprise 3.3% of the county’s total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 205 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 561, up six from Tuesday. The age group makes up 9%, of the county’s total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 97 have been hospitalized, up four, and 24 have died, up one from Tuesday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 192 cases, up three since Tuesday. They comprise 3.1% of the county’s total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 192 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 53 have been hospitalized, up one, and 30 have died, up one in the last 24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 149 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up three in the past 24 hours. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.4% of the county’s cases.

Of the 149 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 49 have been hospitalized, up one, and 48 have died, also up one.

Tuesday, May 26: Prince William adds 413 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday — a new record — plus 3 more deaths

New COVID-19 cases spiked again across the state Tuesday, with 413 new cases and three new deaths reported in the Prince William Health District and 1,615 new cases and 28 new deaths reported across the state, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

It’s the second-straight day of record-breaking new COVID-19 cases in Virginia. The Prince William Health District also set a new record in new daily cases, topping the previous record of 313 cases set on Monday, May 11.

New deaths reported locally include two in Prince William County and one in Manassas Park. The latest fatalities are all men, including one in their 50s and two in their 60s.

Local deaths: The new numbers bring the Prince William Health District’s death toll to 111. The three deaths reported on Tuesday follow the 20 reported locally over the Memorial Day weekend. Those 20 included five women and 15 men, including one in their 30s, one in their 40s, two in their 50s, six in their 60s, five in their 70s and five age 80 or older. 

Because of privacy laws, the state releases only limited information about COVID-19 victims, such as gender, age range (within 10 years) and place of residence.

The new numbers bring the Prince William Health District’s cumulative COVID-19 numbers to 6,225 cases, 521 hospitalizations and 111 deaths.

Statewide, the daily additions bring the total number of COVID-19 cases to 39,342, the number of hospitalizations to 4,325, up 56, and the number of deaths across the state to 1,236, up 28.

Tests: The jump in cases across the state coincides with a sharp uptick in daily tests. Virginia administered 11,874 COVID-19 tests across the state on Friday, May 22, according to the latest VDH report. That’s the largest number of daily tests ever reported and the first day that testing exceeded Northam’s goal of 10,000 daily tests.

Locally, the Prince William Health District reported 1,960 tests on Friday, May 22, which far exceeds any previous one-day record. Since the pandemic began, the Prince William Health District has processed 22,558 tests.

Percent-positivity rate: The local health district’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests dipped again on Tuesday and now stands at 22.3%, according to the VDH report.

Prince William’s percent-positivity rate is now third in the state, behind Lord Fairfax, which has a rate of 25.5% and Fairfax County, which reported a rate of 22.4% on Tuesday. The Lord Fairfax Health District includes Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren counties as well as the City of Winchester — all of which entered phase one of Virginia’s reopening phases on Friday, May 15.

Virginia’s percent-positivity rate also dipped slightly from 14.3% on Monday to 14.1% on Tuesday, the VDH data says.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of five key measures the Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s three reopening phases. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 673 deaths in Northern Virginia, up 20 from Monday. They include 41 in Alexandria, up three; 104 in Arlington, up three; 340 in Fairfax County, up nine; four in Fairfax City, up one; six in Falls Church, up one; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; 52 in Loudoun County, unchanged; nine in the City of Manassas, unchanged; six in Manassas Park, up one; 96 in Prince William County, up two; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and six in Spotsylvania County, up one.

Hospitalizations: According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,403 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Tuesday, up 27 from Monday, with 366 in intensive care units, up 17, and 180 on ventilators, up eight.

Also, 5,227 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Tuesday, May 26, up 82 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 23,619 cases of COVID-19, up 1,216 in the last 24 hours. 

They include 1,785 in Alexandria, up 31; 1,935 in Arlington, up 38; 956 in the City of Manassas, up 107; 277 in Manassas Park, up 16; and 9,839 in Fairfax County, up 357.

Meanwhile, there are now 300 cases in Fauquier County, up 15; 2,186 in Loudoun County, up 139; 4,992 in Prince William County, up 290; 463 in Spotsylvania County, up 41; and 642 in Stafford County, up 43.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Monday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,369, up 104 from Monday. The age group makes up 22.3%, of the county’s total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 99 have been hospitalized, up two, and three have died, the latter of which is unchanged from Monday.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,181, up 71 from Monday. The age group makes up 19.3% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the third-highest number of cases with 1,093, up 85 from Monday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.8% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 32 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged from Monday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 1,014, up 54 from Monday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.5% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 122 have been hospitalized, up two, and seven have died, up one from Monday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 388, up 25 from Monday. The group makes up 6.3% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county’s children — those ages 9 and younger  accounted for 200 cases, up 20 from Monday. Children under 9 comprise 3.3% of the county’s total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 200 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 555 cases, up 33 from Monday. The age group makes up 9%, of the county’s total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 97 have been hospitalized, up four, and 23 have died, up two from Monday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 189 cases, up nine since Monday. They comprise 3.1% of the county’s total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 189 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 52 have been hospitalized, up one, and 29 have died, which is unchanged in the last 24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 146 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up eight in the past 24 hours. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.4% of the county’s cases.

Of the 146 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 48 have been hospitalized and 47 have died, both of which are unchanged.

Monday, May 25: Memorial Day marks pandemic’s deadliest day in Prince William

After a Sunday lull, the Prince William Health District’s COVID-19 numbers spiked again Monday with 13 new fatalities, 11 new hospitalizations and 299 new cases of the disease reported in the past 24 hours, according to the most recent data posted by the Virginia Department of Health.

The sharp increases coincide with largest one-day bump in new COVID-19 cases reported across the state. There were 1,483 new COVID-19 cases reported in Virginia on Monday, along with 55 new hospitalizations and 37 new deaths.

The number of fatalities reported in Virginia over the last 24 hours matches the number reported Friday, May 22, which Gov. Ralph Northam called “concerning.” It is the fourth-largest daily death toll since May 3, when the state reported 44 deaths, the highest one-day loss since the pandemic began.

Local deaths: The new numbers bring the Prince William Health District’s death toll to 108. Prince William County reported 10 additional deaths, while the city of Manassas reported two and Manassas Park reported one. Monday, Memorial Day, marked the largest number of local COVID-19 deaths reported in a 24-hour period since the pandemic began.

The latest local victims of COVID-19 include four women and nine men. The youngest was in their 40s, while one was in their 50s, five were in their 60s, two were in their 70s and four were age 80 or older, according to the VDH report.

Because of privacy laws, the state releases only limited information about COVID-19 victims, such as gender, age range (within 10 years) and place of residence.

The new numbers bring the Prince William Health District’s cumulative COVID-19 numbers to 5,812 cases, 512 hospitalizations and 108 deaths.

Statewide, the daily additions bring the total number of COVID-19 cases to 37,727, the number of hospitalizations to 4,269, and the number of deaths to 1,208.

Tests: The jump in cases across the state coincides with a sharp uptick in daily tests. Virginia administered 11,865 COVID-19 tests across the state on Friday, May 22. That’s the largest number of daily tests ever reported and the first day that testing exceeded Northam’s goal of 10,000 daily tests.

Locally, the Prince William Health District reported 1,960 tests on Friday, May 22, which far exceeds any previous one-day record. Since the pandemic began, the Prince William Health District has processed 22,105 tests.

Percent-positivity rate: The local health district’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests dipped again on Monday and now stands at 24%, according to the VDH report.

Prince William’s percent-positivity rate remains second only to the Lord Fairfax Health District, which reported a 24.8% positive rate relative to tests, a dip from Sunday’s 27.3%. The Lord Fairfax Health District includes Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren counties as well as the City of Winchester — all of which entered phase one of Virginia’s reopening phases on Friday, May 15.

Virginia’s percent-positivity rate also dipped slightly from 14.4% on Sunday to 14.3% on Monday, the VDH data says.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of five key measures the Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s three reopening phases. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 653 deaths, up 21 from Sunday. They include 38 in Alexandria, unchanged; 101 in Arlington, up three; 331 in Fairfax County, up four; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; five in Falls Church, unchanged; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; 52 in Loudoun County, unchanged; nine in the City of Manassas, up two; five in Manassas Park, up one; 94 in Prince William County, up 10; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and five in Spotsylvania County, unchanged.

Hospitalizations: According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,376 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Monday, up 25 from Sunday, with 349 in intensive care units, down five, and 182 on ventilators, down 10.

Also, 5,145 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Monday, May 25, up 43 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 22,403 cases of COVID-19, up 993 in the last 24 hours. 

They include 1,754 in Alexandria, up 21; 1,897 in Arlington, up 24; 849 in the City of Manassas, up 43; 261 in Manassas Park, up 22; and 9,482 in Fairfax County, up 493.

Meanwhile, there are now 285 cases in Fauquier County, up three; 2,047 in Loudoun County, up 226; 4,702 in Prince William County, up 234; 422 in Spotsylvania County, up 21; and 599 in Stafford County, up 18.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Monday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,265, up 54 from Sunday. The age group makes up 22.1%, of the county’s total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 97 have been hospitalized, up one, and three have died, also up one from Sunday.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,110, up 50 from Sunday. The age group makes up 19.4% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 960, up 46 from Sunday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.8% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 120 have been hospitalized and six have died, both of which are up one from Sunday.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 1,008, up 60 from Sunday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.6% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 32 have been hospitalized, up one, and none have died.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 363, up 23 from Sunday. The group makes up 6.3% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county’s children — those ages 9 and younger  accounted for 180 cases, up 18 from Sunday. Children under 9 comprise 3.1% of the county’s total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 180 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 522 cases, up 28 from Sunday. The age group makes up 9.1%, of the county’s total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 93 have been hospitalized, up four, and 21 have died, up five from Sunday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 180 cases, up 11 since Sunday. They comprise 3.1% of the county’s total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 180 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 51 have been hospitalized, up one, and 29 have died, up two in the last  24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 138 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up four in the past 24 hours. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.4% of the county’s cases.

Of the 138 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 48 have been hospitalized, up three, and 47 have died, up four from Sunday.

Sunday, May 24: Prince William Health District adds fewer COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

After losing 17 people to COVID-19 in the past week, the Prince William Health District reported no additional deaths on Sunday. Also, new cases of COVID-19 dropped to 83, about one-third fewer than the 123 new cases reported Saturday.

The local health district’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests similarly dipped to 25% on Sunday. The new number means Prince William County no longer leads the state on the percent of positive results relative to new COVID-19 tests, according to the latest data released from the Virginia Department of Health.

The Prince William Health District is now in second place behind Lord Fairfax Health District, which led the state with a percent-positivity rate of 27.3% on Sunday, May 24. The Lord Fairfax Health District includes Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren counties as well as the City of Winchester — all of which entered phase one of Virginia’s reopening phases on Friday, May 15.

Lord Fairfax Health District’s percent-positivity rate rose from 23.5% on May 16 to 27.3% on Sunday. The health district, however, has reported fewer than 100 tests a day over the past week.

The Prince William Health District, in contrast, has been testing about 1,000 people a day in the past week, the VDH report says.

The new numbers bring the Prince William Health District’s cumulative COVID-19 numbers to 5,513 cases, 475 hospitalizations and 95 deaths.

Statewide, Virginia on Sunday added 495 new COVID-19 cases, the lowest number since April 13, as well as 33 new hospitalizations and 12 new deaths. The additions bring the state’s cumulative COVID-19 tallies to 36,224 cases, 4,214 hospitalizations and 1,171 deaths.

Virginia’s percent-positivity rate — positive cases relative to tests — dipped slightly from 14.6% on Saturday to on 14.4% Sunday. Virginia, however, has yet to meet Gov. Ralph Northam’s goal of administering 10,000 tests a day, the VDH data indicates.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of five key measures the Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s three reopening phases. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 632 deaths, up five from Saturday. They include 38 in Alexandria, unchanged; 98 in Arlington, up three; 327 in Fairfax County, up one; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; five in Falls Church, unchanged; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; 52 in Loudoun County, unchanged; seven in the City of Manassas, unchanged; four in Manassas Park, unchanged; 84 in Prince William County, unchanged; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and five in Spotsylvania County, up one.

Hospitalizations: According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,351 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Sunday, down 34 from Saturday, with 354 in intensive care units, up 24, and 192 on ventilators, down 21.

Also, 5,102 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Sunday, May 24, up 55 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 21,410 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,733 in Alexandria, up 30; 1,873 in Arlington, up 69; 806 in the City of Manassas, up 13; 239 in Manassas Park, up nine; and 8,989 in Fairfax County, up 44.

Meanwhile, there are now 282 cases in Fauquier County, up 13; 1,821 in Loudoun County, down 10 from Saturday (without explanation); 4,468 in Prince William County, up 60; 401 in Spotsylvania County, up 15; and 581 in Stafford County, up 12.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,211, up 22 from Saturday. The age group makes up 22.3%, of the county’s total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 96 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,060, up 13 from Saturday. The age group makes up 19.5% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 914, up 16 from Friday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.8% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 119 have been hospitalized and five have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 948, up 13 from Saturday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.5% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 31 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 340, up 13 from Saturday. The group makes up 6.3% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county’s children — those ages 9 and younger  accounted for 162 cases, up four from Saturday. Children under 9 comprise 3% of the county’s total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 162 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 494 cases, up two from Saturday. The age group makes up 9.1%, of the county’s total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 89 have been hospitalized and 16 have died, both of which are unchanged from Saturday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 169 cases, unchanged from Saturday. They comprise 3.1% of the county’s total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 169 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 50 have been hospitalized and 27 have died, both of which are unchanged in the last  24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 134 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.5% of the county’s cases.

Of the 134 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 45 have been hospitalized and 43 have died, both of which are unchanged.

Saturday, May 23: Prince William loses 4 more residents to COVID-19, bringing the local death toll to 95

The Prince William Health District has lost four more residents to COVID-19, bringing the local death toll due to the disease to 95, according to Saturday’s report from the Virginia Department of Health.

The new fatalities include one woman and three men: one in their 60s, two in their 70s and one age 80 or older, according to VDH data.

Because of privacy laws, the state releases only limited information about COVID-19 victims, such as gender, age range (within 10 years) and place of residence.

Residents lost in the Prince William Health District, which includes the county and the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park, include 84 in the county, seven in the City of Manassas and four in Manassas Park.

In terms of age and gender, total local fatalities include those of 50 women and 45 men. Forty-five were 80 or older; 27 were in their 70s; 16 were in their 60s; five were in their 50s; two were in their 40s and two were in their 30s.

Statewide, Virginia added 799 new cases of COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, down from 813 new cases the previous day. Virginia’s percent-positivity rate — positive cases relative to tests — dipped slightly to 14.6% from Friday’s 14.7%.

The Prince William Health District continues to have the highest percent-positivity rate in the state at 26%, but that was also down from 27.6% on Friday.

The local health district added 123 new COVID-19 cases and five hospitalizations in addition to four new deaths. The additions bring the local health district’s COVID-19 tallies to 5,430 cases, 501 hospitalizations and 95 deaths.

Across Virginia, the COVID-19 totals rose to 35,749 cases, up 799; 4,181 hospitalizations, up 36; and 1,159 deaths, an increase of 23 deaths in the past 24 hours. 

Local tests: Saturday’s VDH report shows the county health district administered more than 1,000 tests on two days last week. On Tuesday, May 19, 1,178 tests were administered in the health district. On Wednesday, May 20, the health district administered 1,099 tests. (Daily test totals can change as more are processed and reported.)

As of Saturday, a total of 19,132 tests have been reported from the Prince William Health District with a percent-positive rate 26%.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of five key measures Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s three reopening phases. Northam has said the state needs to see a 14-day downward trajectory in the percent-positivity rate before moving into phase one, which most of Virginia did on Friday, May 15.

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 627 deaths, up 114 from Thursday. They include 38 in Alexandria, up one; 95 in Arlington, up four; 326 in Fairfax County, up five; three in Fairfax City, down one (without explanation); five in Falls Church, unchanged; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; 52 in Loudoun County, up one; seven in the City of Manassas, unchanged; four in Manassas Park, unchanged; 84 in Prince William County, up four; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and four in Spotsylvania County, unchanged.

Hospitalizations: According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,385 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Saturday, down 75 from Friday, with 330 in intensive care units, down 36, and 213 on ventilators, up six.

Also, 5,047 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Saturday, May 23, up 84 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 21,149 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,703 in Alexandria, up 76; 1,804 in Arlington, up nine; 792 in the City of Manassas, up 28; 230 in Manassas Park, up two; and 8,945 in Fairfax County, up 211.

Meanwhile, there are now 269 cases in Fauquier County, up two; 1,831 in Loudoun County, up 24; 4,408 in Prince William County, up 93; 386  in Spotsylvania County, up 13; and 569 in Stafford County, up 17.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,189, up 29 from Friday. The age group makes up 22.2%, of the county’s total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 96 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged since Friday.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,047, up 25 from Friday. The age group makes up 19.6% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized, up one, and two have died, which is unchanged since Friday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 898, up 16 from Friday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.8% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 119 have been hospitalized, up two, and five have died, the latter of which is unchanged since Friday.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 935, up 23 from Friday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.5% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 31 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged from Friday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 327, up 10 from Friday. The group makes up 6.1% of the county’s COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county’s children — those ages 9 and younger — accounted for 158 cases, up seven from Friday. Children under 9 comprise 3% of the county’s total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 158 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 492 cases, up eight from Friday. The age group makes up 9.2%, of the county’s total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 89 have been hospitalized, up one, and 16 have died, the latter of which is up one from Friday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 169 cases, up one from Friday. They comprise 3.2% of the county’s total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 169 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 50 have been hospitalized and 27 have died, up two in the last  24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 134 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up two from Friday. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.5% of the county’s cases.

Of the 134 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 45 have been hospitalized, up one, and 43 have died, also up one from Friday.

 

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